Mexican Art and Decor

Mexican art and decor is full of rich history.

Mexican Art, Ixtapa Mexican Grill and Cantina, MassachusettsTo some, Mexican décor may seem odd or even tacky. The colors, for example, are bright, vibrant, and often do not “match”, according to American standards. To understand the true beauty of Mexican décor, one must understand the cultural, economic and historic elements that makes Mexican art and decor so diverse.

Mexican Art, Ixtapa Mexican Grill and Cantina, Massachusetts

Non-Traditional Use of Tile

Tile is commonly used for non-kitchen and bath applications in Mexican homes, such as a baseboard or chair rail color transition. Vibrant colors are typically employed for tiling. Clay, a staple in the area, is also used heavily in Mexican décor.

Chipped Paint, Cracked Walls

Mexican Art, Ixtapa Mexican Grill and Cantina, Massachusetts

Old and rustic-looking modern decor is often purposeful, as it retains the indigenous style found throughout Mexican history. Modern projects that seek a historical orientation will often replicate this look.

Mexican Art, Ixtapa Mexican Grill and Cantina, Massachusetts

Vibrant Colors

Many Mexican themes contain a variety of warm, bright, and vibrant colors. Many of these colors, by American standards and style, do not match. These colors catch the eye quickly with a pop and wow factor, such as red, blue, green, yellow, orange, etc.

Green, White, and Red

Mexican Art, Ixtapa Mexican Grill and Cantina, MassachusettsThe cultural significance of the colors of the Mexican flag is full of history. When created, the flag represented the people’s identify. Green represented independence from Spain, white represented the country’s faith (the Roman Catholic Church), and red meant their strong relations with Americans and Europeans. Over the years, these colors have changed to incorporate other values; Green – hope in the future, white – unity among the Mexican people, and red – the blood of the Mexican heroes. These colors are commonly reflected in Mexican décor.

Mexican Art, Ixtapa Mexican Grill and Cantina, Massachusetts

Roof Tiles

Clay, a common fabrication staple in Central and South America, is used for non-traditional uses, such as roofing tile that diverts water away from the walls of a structure, just like a gutter.

Skulls

Mexican Art, Ixtapa Mexican Grill and Cantina, Massachusetts Mexican décor and artistry commonly reference skulls. Skulls are the central symbol for the Mexican national holiday called the Day of the Dead. This holiday focuses on gatherings where a family will pray for and celebrate their loved ones who have died. For thousands of years, the people of Central and South America have celebrated and honored their ancestors, so this is oftentimes reflected in their décor.

Uneven Walls

Mexican Art, Ixtapa Mexican Grill and Cantina, Massachusetts

Many interior and exterior walls of Mexican structures are uneven. This style usually stems from the mortar applied over brick walls. Many structures purposefully use this style for a culturally themed architectural touch.

Mexican Art, Ixtapa Mexican Grill and Cantina, MassachusettsBeveled Edges

Many corners and edges of walls, ceilings, integrated benches, and stair railing guards found in Mexican architecture have beveled, curved edges. This style is also found in Southwestern American homes. These edges are fabricated using mortar to create the desired edge.

After closer examination, Mexican art and décor are more than superficial, but are involved in a complex story of the nation’s history and culture. All of Ixtapa Grill and Cantina’s restaurant locations are designed and built to create an authentic atmosphere, including our traditional Mexican food. Pay us a visit at one of our locations throughout Massachusetts today!

What is your take on Mexican art and decor? Have you visited Mexico before? How does it compare to other culture’s art and decor styles?